Top 6 Most Expensive Photos In The World: Photography is the art, application and practice of creating durable images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as photographic film. It is employed in many fields of science, manufacturing (e.g., photolithography), and business, as well as its more direct uses for art, film and video production, recreational purposes, hobby, and mass communication.

Here is the list of the Top 6 Most Expensive Photos In The World Ever

Content Highlights:
  • Phantom: $6.5 Million
  • Rhein II: $4.3 Million
  • Untitled #96: $3.8 Million
  • 99 Cent II Diptychon: $3.3 Million
  • The Pond—Moonlight: $2.9 Million
  • Tintype: $2.3 Million
1- Phantom: $6.5 Million

Australian landscape photographer Peter Lik has taken the crown for most expensive photo ever sold. “Phantom,” was sold to a private collector for a staggering $6.5 million. The record was previously held by Andreas Gursky’s “Rhein II”, which sold for $4.3 million back in 2011.
Meet The World Record Most Expensive Photo Sold For $6.5 Million

“Phantom” was captured at Arizona’s Antelope Canyon, a slot canyon that’s popular among landscape photographers, and shows a beam of light resembling a “ghostlike figure” (hence the name). It’s a black-and-white version of a photograph that has also been printed in color with the title, “Ghost.”

2- Rhein II: $4.3 Million
Rhein II: $4.3 Million

Rhein II is a photograph made by German visual artist Andreas Gursky in 1999.[2] In the image, a river (the Lower Rhine) flows horizontally across the field of view, between flat green fields, under an overcast sky. Extraneous details such as dog walkers and a factory building were removed by the artist using digital editing.

In 2011, a print was auctioned for $4.3 million (then £2.7m), making it the most expensive photograph ever sold.

3- Untitled #96: $3.8 Million

Untitled #96: $3.8 Million

Untitled #96 is a photograph made by American visual artist Cindy Sherman in 1981. It is known as part of her Centerfold series. In May 2011, a print was auctioned for US$3.89 million, the highest price paid for a photographic print at that time, though the price has since been surpassed.

4- 99 Cent II Diptychon: $3.3 Million
99 Cent II Diptychon: $3.3 Million

The artwork 99 Cent II Diptychon from 2001 is a two-part photograph made by Andreas Gursky probably in 1999, as the work is sometimes called "99 cent.1999".

The work depicts an interior of a supermarket with numerous aisles depicting goods resulting in a colorful work. The work is digitally altered to reduce perspective. The photograph is a chromogenic color print or c-print. It is a two-part work, also called a diptych. There were 6 sets made and mounted on acrylic glass. The photographs have a size of 2.07 by 3.37 metres (6.8 ft × 11.1 ft).

5- The Pond—Moonlight: $2.9 Million
The Pond—Moonlight: $2.9 Million

The Pond—Moonlight (also exhibited as The Pond—Moonrise [1][2]) is a pictorialist photograph by Edward Steichen. The photograph was made in 1904 in Mamaroneck, New York, near the home of his friend art critic Charles Caffin.

The photograph features a forest across a pond, with part of the moon appearing over the horizon in a gap in the trees. The Pond—Moonlight is an early photograph created by manually applying light-sensitive gums, giving the final print more than one color.

Only three known versions of The Pond-Moonlight are still in existence and, as a result of the hand-layering of the gums, each is unique. In February 2006, a print of the photograph sold for US $2.9 million, at the time, the highest price ever paid for a photograph at auction. This auction is presented in the part 6 of the BBC documentary The Genius of Photography.

In addition to the auctioned print, the other two versions are held in museum collections. The extraordinary sale price of the print is, in part, attributable to its one-of-a-kind character and to its rarity.

6- Tintype: $2.3 Million
Tintype: $2.3 Million

tintype, also known as a melainotype or ferrotype, is a photograph made by creating a direct positive on a thin sheet of metal coated with a dark lacquer or enamel and used as the support for the photographic emulsion. Tintypes enjoyed their widest use during the 1860s and 1870s, but lesser use of the medium persisted into the early 20th century and it has been revived as a novelty and fine art form in the 21st.

Tintype portraits were at first usually made in a formal photographic studio, like daguerreotypes and other early types of photographs, but later they were most commonly made by photographers working in booths or the open air at fairs and carnivals, as well as by itinerant sidewalk photographers. Because the lacquered iron support (there is no actual tin used) was resilient and did not need drying, a tintype could be developed and fixed and handed to the customer only a few minutes after the picture had been taken.

The tintype photograph saw more uses and captured a wider variety of settings and subjects than any other photographic type. It was introduced while the daguerreotype was still popular, though its primary competition would have been the ambrotype.

The tintype saw the Civil War come and go, documenting the individual soldier and horrific battle scenes. It captured scenes from the Wild West, as it was easy to produce by itinerant photographers working out of covered wagons.