French cuisine was made important in the 20th century by Auguste Escoffier to become the modern haute cuisine; Escoffier, however, left out much of the local culinary character to be found in the regions of France and was considered difficult to execute by home cooks. Gastro-tourism and the Guide Michelin helped to acquaint people with the rich bourgeois and peasant cuisine of the French countryside starting in the 20th century. Gascon cuisine has also had great influence over the cuisine in the southwest of France. Many dishes that were once regional have proliferated in variations across the country.

Knowledge of French cooking has contributed significantly to Western cuisines. Its criteria are used widely in Western cookery school boards and culinary education. In November 2010, French gastronomy was added by the UNESCO to its lists of the world's "intangible cultural heritage".

1- Steak frites
Top 10 Best French Dishes in French Cuisine

Steak-frites, meaning "steak [and] fries" in French, is a very common and popular dish served in brasseries throughout Europe consisting of steak paired with French fries. It is considered by some to be the national dish of Belgium, which claims to be the place of its invention.

Historically, the rump steak was commonly used for this dish. More typically at the present time, the steak is an entrecôte also called rib eye, or scotch fillet (in Australia), pan-fried rare ("saignant"—literally "bloody"), in a pan reduction sauce, although hollandaise or béarnaise sauce are not uncommon, served with deep-fried potatoes (French fries).

Francophilia led to its generalization to the Portuguese-speaking world, where it is called bife e [batatas] fritas or bife com batata frita, especially in Brazil, where the sauce is usually just onion rings cooked and fried in the steak's own juice and frying oil, being the most popular dish to go aside rice and beans. It is also very popular in the Spanish-speaking world.

Steak-frites is the subject of a semiotic analysis by the French cultural theorist Roland Barthes in his 1957 work Mythologies.

2- Pot-au-feu
Pot-au-feu

Pot-au-feu is a French beef stew. According to the chef Raymond Blanc, pot-au-feu is "the quintessence of French family cuisine, it is the most celebrated dish in France. It honours the tables of the rich and poor alike.

3- Quiche
Quiche

Quiche is a savoury dish consisting of pastry crust filled with eggs, milk or cream, and cheese, meat, seafood or vegetables. Quiche can be served hot or cold. It is part of French cuisine but is also popular in other countries, particularly as party food.

4- Andouillette
Andouillette

Andouillette is a coarse-grained sausage made with pork (or occasionally veal), intestines or chitterlings, pepper, wine, onions, and seasonings. Tripe, which is the stomach lining of a cow, is sometimes an ingredient in the filler of an andouillette, but it is not the casing or the key to its manufacture. 

True andouillette will be an oblong tube. If made with the small intestine, it is a plump sausage generally about 25 mm in diameter but often it is much larger, possibly 7–10 cm in diameter, and stronger in scent when the colon is used. True andouillette is rarely seen outside France and has a strong, distinctive odour related to its intestinal origins and components. Although sometimes repellent to the uninitiated, this aspect of andouillette is prized by its devotees.

5- Gratin dauphinois
Gratin dauphinois

Gratin dauphinois is a French dish of sliced potatoes baked in milk or cream, from the Dauphiné region in south-eastern France. There are many variants of the name of the dish, including pommes de terre dauphinoise, potatoes à la dauphinoise and gratin de pommes à la dauphinoise.

The gratin dauphinois is made with raw potatoes, thinly sliced, and milk and/or cream, cooked in a buttered dish rubbed with garlic; for 1 kg of potatoes, about 600 ml of milk, 25 g of butter and a clove of garlic are needed. The potatoes are peeled and sliced to the thickness of a coin, preferably with a mandoline; they are layered in a shallow earthenware dish and cooked in a slow oven, at about 150 °C (300 °F), for more than an hour; the heat is raised for the last 10 minutes of the cooking time.

Recipes given by many authorities including Auguste Escoffier and Austin de Croze call for the addition of cheese and eggs to the dish; Robert Carrier and Constance Spry give recipes including these additions.

The dish is distinguished from gratin savoyard by not including cheese, and from ordinary gratin potatoes by the use of raw rather than boiled potatoes. It is a quite different dish from pommes dauphine.

6- Aligot
Aligot

Aligot is a dish made from cheese blended into mashed potatoes (often with some garlic) that is made in L'Aubrac (Aveyron, Cantal, Lozère, Occitanie) region in southern Massif Central of France. This fondue-like dish from the Aveyron department is a common sight in Auvergne restaurants.

Traditionally made with the Tomme de Laguiole (Tome fraîche) or Tomme d'Auvergne cheese, aligot is a French country speciality highly appreciated in the local gastronomy with Toulouse sausages or roast pork. Other cheeses are used in place of Tomme, including Mozzarella, Cantal and Laguiole.

Aligot is made from mashed potatoes blended with butter, cream, crushed garlic, and the melted cheese. The dish is ready when it develops a smooth, elastic texture. While recipes vary, the Larousse Gastronomique gives the recipe as 1 kg potatoes; 500 g tomme fraîche, Laguiole, or Cantal cheese; 2 garlic cloves; 30 g butter; salt and pepper.

This dish was prepared for pilgrims on the way to Santiago de Compostela who stopped for a night in that region. According to legend, aligot was originally prepared with bread, and potatoes were substituted after their introduction to France. Today, it is enjoyed for village gatherings and celebrations as a main dish. Aligot is still cooked by hand in Aveyron, at home as well as in street markets. Aligot is traditionally served with Auvergne red wine.

7- Cassoulet
Cassoulet

Cassoulet is a rich, slow-cooked casserole containing meat (typically pork sausages, goose, duck and sometimes mutton), pork skin (couennes) and white beans (haricots blancs), originating in southern France. It is named after its traditional cooking vessel, the cassole, a deep, round, earthenware pot with slanting sides.[5]

The traditional homeland of cassoulet is the region once known as the province of Languedoc, especially the towns of Toulouse, Carcassonne, and Castelnaudary, which is said to be where the dish originated. An organization called The Grand Brotherhood of the Cassoulet of Castelnaudary, La Grande Confrérie du Cassoulet de Castelnaudary, has organized competitions and fairs featuring cassoulet every year since 1999.

All cassoulets are made with white beans (haricots blancs or lingots),[a] duck or goose confit, sausages, and additional meat. In the cassoulet of Toulouse, the meats are pork and mutton, the latter frequently a cold roast shoulder. The Carcassonne version is similar but doubles the portion of mutton and sometimes replaces the duck with partridge. The cassoulet of Castelnaudary uses a duck confit instead of mutton.

In France, cassoulets of varying price and quality are also sold in cans and jars in supermarkets, grocery stores and charcuteries. The cheapest ones contain only beans, tomato sauce, sausages, and bacon. More expensive versions are likely to be cooked with goose fat and to include Toulouse sausages, lamb, goose, or duck confit.

8- Salade niçoise
Salade niçoise

alade niçoise, la salada nissarda in the Niçard dialect of the Occitan language, is a salad that originated in the French city of Nice. It is traditionally made of tomatoes, hard-boiled eggs, Niçoise olives and anchovies, and is dressed with olive oil. It has been popular worldwide since the early 20th century, and has been prepared and discussed by many famous chefs. Delia Smith called it "one of the best combinations of salad ingredients ever invented" and Gordon Ramsay said that "it must be the finest summer salad of all."

It can be served either as a composed salad or as a tossed salad. Freshly cooked or canned tuna may be used. For decades, there has been significant disagreement between traditionalists and innovators regarding which ingredients should and should not be included in a salade niçoise. According to traditionalists, it excludes cooked vegetables. 

The salad may include raw red peppers, shallots, artichoke hearts and other seasonal raw vegetables. Raw green beans harvested in the spring, when they are still young and crisp, may be included. However, cooked green beans and potatoes are commonly served in variations of salade niçoise that are popular around the world.

9- Bouillabaisse
Bouillabaisse

Bouillabaisse is a traditional Provençal fish stew originating from the port city of Marseille. The French and English form bouillabaisse comes from the Provençal Occitan word bolhabaissa, a compound that consists of the two verbs bolhir (to boil) and abaissar (to reduce heat, i.e., simmer).

Bouillabaisse was originally a stew made by Marseille fishermen using the bony rockfish which they were unable to sell to restaurants or markets. There are at least three kinds of fish in a traditional bouillabaisse: typically red rascasse (Scorpaena scrofa); sea robin; and European conger. It can also include gilt-head bream, turbot, monkfish, mullet, or European hake. It usually also includes shellfish and other seafood such as sea urchins, mussels, velvet crabs, spider crab or octopus. More expensive versions may add langoustine (Norway lobster), though this was not part of the traditional dish made by Marseille fishermen. Vegetables such as leeks, onions, tomatoes, celery, and potatoes are simmered together with the broth and served with the fish. The broth is traditionally served with a rouille, a mayonnaise made of olive oil, garlic, saffron, and cayenne pepper on grilled slices of bread.

What makes a bouillabaisse different from other fish soups is the selection of Provençal herbs and spices in the broth; the use of bony local Mediterranean fish; the way the fish are added one at a time, and brought to a boil; and the method of serving. In Marseille, the broth is served first in a soup plate with slices of bread and rouille, then the fish is served separately on a large platter (see image at right); or, more simply, as Julia Child suggests, the fish and broth are brought to the table separately and served together in large soup plates.

10- Pan bagnat
Pan bagnat

The pan bagnat is a sandwich that is a specialty of the Nice area. It is also a specialty food and street food of Nice, France. The sandwich is composed of pain de campagne, whole wheat bread formed in a circle around the classic salade niçoise, a salad composed mainly of raw vegetables, hard boiled eggs, anchovies and/or tuna, and olive oil, salt, and pepper (never mayonnaise). Sometimes vinegar might be added. It has historically been prepared as a use for day-old bread.

The pan bagnat is a popular dish in the region around Nice where it is sold in most bakeries and markets. Pan bagnat and the salade niçoise (salade nissarda), along with ratatouille (La Ratatouia Nissarda in Provençal), socca and pissaladière are strongly linked to the city of Nice, where they have been developed over time out of local ingredients. It is sometimes served as an hors d'oeuvre.

Pan bagnat is prepared using bread or homemade bread that is generally round (French: pain de ménage) optionally rubbed with garlic, tuna, anchovies, sliced tomato, olives, olive oil salt and pepper. Additional ingredients to prepare the dish can include arugula, basil, artichoke, and red wine vinegar. The olive oil is typically used on the bread, which may be marinated or soaked in the oil and then strained off, hence the name "bathed bread". The garlic is sometimes used to rub the bread with.