The List of the Top 10 Famous German Dishes: The cuisine of Germany has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region.

Some regions of Germany, like Bavaria and neighbouring Swabia, share dishes with Austrian and parts of Swiss cuisine.

The Michelin Guide of 2015 awarded 11 restaurants in Germany three stars, the highest designation, while 38 more received two stars and 233 one star. German restaurants have become the world's second-most decorated after France.

1- Aachener Printen
Top Famous German Dishes: German Cuisine

Aachener Printen are a type of Lebkuchen originating from the city of Aachen in Germany. Somewhat similar to gingerbread, Printen were originally sweetened with honey, but for two centuries the tradition is to use a syrup made from sugar beets.

The term is a protected designation of origin and so all manufacturers can be found in or near Aachen.

Main ingredients: sugar beets, spices (cinnamon, aniseed, clove, cardamom, coriander, allspice, ginger).

2- Apple pie
Apple pie

An apple pie is a pie in which the principal filling ingredient is apple. It is, on occasion, served with whipped cream or iced cream (which is known as apple pie a la mode), or with cheddar cheese. The pastry part is generally used top-and-bottom, making it a double-crust pie; the upper crust may be circular or latticed (woven of crosswise strips). Depending on the baker's preference, the bottom crust may be baked first (before baking the whole pie) to prevent it from getting soggy. Exceptions are: deep-dish apple pie (with a top crust only) and the open-faced French dessert tarte Tatin.

Apple pie is an unofficial symbol of the United States and one of its signature comfort foods.

Apple pie can be made with many different sorts of apples. The more popular cooking apples include, Braeburn, Gala, Cortland, Bramley, Empire, Northern Spy, Granny Smith, and McIntosh. The fruit for the pie can be fresh, canned, or reconstituted from dried apples. These different types of apples (canned, dried, fresh) affects the final texture and the length of cooking time required will vary, therefore people disagree[citation needed] on if it affects the flavour or not. Dried or preserved apples were originally substituted only at times when fresh fruit was unavailable. Along with the apples people commonly use, cinnamon, salt, butter, and most importantly sugar. 

Though most of the old recipes don't include sugar due to the price or having a better sweetener option, most people definitely use it today. Apple pie is often served in the style of "à la Mode" (topped with ice cream). Alternatively, a piece of sharp cheddar cheese is, at times, placed on top of or alongside a slice of the finished pie. Apple pie with cheddar is popular in the American Midwest and New England, particularly in Vermont, where it is considered the state dish.

3- German fries
German fries

German fries (also referred to as German fried potatoes) is a name for fries or a preparation of fries in which potatoes are sliced into any sizes and shapes, fried or deep-fried, and sometimes prepared with additional cooked ingredients such as onion, green pepper and bacon. By the 1870s, dishes under these names were listed in American and British cookbooks. In German, they are called Bratkartoffeln.

Preparation may involve pan-frying or deep-frying the potatoes and the addition of ingredients such as cooked bacon, onion and green pepper. Some versions may use thinly sliced potatoes. Paprika may added for flavor. Whether raw or cooked potatoes are to be used, the latter either fresh or stored for some days and used only after ageing, remains a question of discussion, depending on personal taste, as well as regional influences.

4- Bratwurst
Bratwurst

Bratwurst is a type of German sausage made from veal, beef, or most commonly pork. The name is derived from the Old High German Brätwurst, from brät-, finely chopped meat, and Wurst, sausage, although in modern German it is often associated with the verb braten, to pan fry or roast. Beef and veal are usual in halal and kosher bratwurst, which never include pork for religious reasons.


5- Currywurst
Currywurst

Currywurst is a fast food dish of German origin consisting of steamed, then fried pork sausage (German: Bratwurst) typically cut into bite-sized chunks and seasoned with curry ketchup, a sauce based on spiced ketchup or tomato paste, itself topped with curry powder, or a ready-made ketchup seasoned with curry and other spices. The dish is often served with French fries.

6- Fischbrötchen
Fischbrötchen

A Fischbrötchen is a sandwich made with fish and other components such as fresh white or dried onions, pickles, remoulade, creamy horseradish sauce, ketchup, or cocktail sauce. It is commonly eaten in Northern Germany, due to the region's proximity to the North Sea and Baltic Sea.

A common preparation is made with bismarck herring or soused herring. Other varieties use Brathering, rollmops, European sprat, salmon, smoked Atlantic mackerel, other fried fish varieties (e.g., fish burgers). Prawns are sometimes used, as are various other species of food fish. Fischbrötchen are commonly served at fast food stands or take-out restaurants.

The Hanover Fair was initially colloquially known as the "Fischbrötchen fair" due to the fish buns served there as a snack.

7- Roast chicken
Roast chicken

Roast chicken is chicken prepared as food by roasting whether in a home kitchen, over a fire, or with a rotisserie (rotary spit). Generally, the chicken is roasted with its own fat and juices by circulating the meat during roasting, and therefore, are usually cooked exposed to fire or heat with some type of rotary grill so that the circulation of these fats and juices is as efficient as possible. Roast chicken is a dish that appears in a wide variety of cuisines worldwide.

8- Potato salad
Potato salad

Potato salad is a dish made from boiled potatoes and a variety of other ingredients. It is generally considered a side dish, as it usually accompanies the main course. Potato salad is widely believed to have originated in Germany from where it spread widely throughout Europe and later to European colonies. American potato salad most likely originated from recipes brought to the U.S. by way of German and European immigrants during the nineteenth century. American-style potato salad is served cold or at room temperature. Ingredients often include mayonnaise or a mayonnaise-like substitute (such as yogurt or sour cream), herbs, and vegetables (such as onion and celery).

9- Cabbage roll
Cabbage roll

A cabbage roll is a dish consisting of cooked cabbage leaves wrapped around a variety of fillings. It is common to the cuisines of the Balkans, Central, Northern, Eastern Europe, Armenia, Greece, Azerbaijan and Iran, as well as West Asia and Northern China.

Meat fillings are traditional in Europe, often beef, lamb, or pork seasoned with garlic, onion, and spices. Grains such as rice and barley, mushrooms, and vegetables are often included. Pickled cabbage leaves are often used for wrapping, particularly in Southeastern Europe. In Asia, seafoods, tofu, and shiitake mushroom may also be used. Chinese cabbage is often used as a wrapping.

Cabbage leaves are stuffed with the filling which are then baked, simmered, or steamed in a covered pot and generally eaten warm, often accompanied with a sauce. The sauce varies widely by cuisine. Always in Sweden and sometimes in Finland, stuffed cabbage is served with lingonberry jam, which is both sweet and tart. In Eastern Europe, tomato-based sauces or plain sour cream are typical. In Lebanon, it is a popular plate, where the cabbage is stuffed with rice and minced meat and only rolled to the size of cigar. It is usually served with a side of yogurt and a type of lemon and olive oil vinaigrette seasoned with garlic and dried mint.

The version called holishkes is traditionally eaten by Jews on Simchat Torah, stuffed cabbage is described by Gil Marks to have entered Jewish cooking some 2,000 years ago. Recipes vary depending on region; Romanians and northern Poles prefer a savory sauce, while Galicia and Ukraine favor sweet-and-sour, for example.

10- Rouladen
Rouladen

Rouladen or Rinderrouladen is a German meat dish, usually consisting of bacon, onions, mustard and pickles wrapped in thinly sliced beef which is then cooked. The dish is considered traditional also in the Upper Silesia region of Poland where it is known as rolada śląska (Silesian roulade) and in the Czech Republic where it is known as španělský ptáček (spanish bird).

Beef or veal is typically used, though some food scholars tend to believe that the original version was probably venison or pork, and pork is still popular in some areas. The beef rouladen as we know them today have become popular over the last century. The cut is usually topside beef or silverside since this is the cheaper cut. The more expensive version would be the round steak, also known as rump steak. The meat is cut into large, thin slices.

The filling is a mixture of smoked and cooked pork belly, chopped onions and chopped pickles (gherkins) which is at times varied by a