The Nobel Prize committee announces the winner of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine  at a news conference in Stockholm.

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine Winners

William G. Kaelin Jr, Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza jointly awarded 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded jointly to William G. Kaelin Jr, Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability, the Nobel Assembly announced on Monday in Stockholm.

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine Winners

Oxygen sensing is central to a large number of diseases. The discoveries made by the three scientists have fundamental importance for physiology and have paved the way for promising new strategies to fight anemia, cancer and many other diseases, according to the committee.

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine Winners

The fundamental importance of oxygen has been understood for centuries, but how cells adapt to changes in oxygen levels has long been unknown. This year's Nobel Prize-awarded work reveals the molecular mechanisms that underlie how cells adapt to variations in oxygen supply.

Winners Profiles:

William "Bill" G. Kaelin Jr

William "Bill" G. Kaelin Jr. (born 1957 in New York City) is a professor of medicine at Harvard University and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Kaelin is a 2019 Nobel laureate in Physiology or Medicine and a 2016 recipient of the Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research. He also has won the 2016 ASCO Science of Oncology Award, and 2016 AACR Princess Takamatsu Award. His laboratory studies tumor suppressor proteins.

He became Assistant Director of Basic Science at the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center in 2008. His research at Dana-Farber has focused on understanding the role of mutations in tumor suppressor genes in cancer development. His major work has been on the retinoblastoma, von Hippel-Lindau, and p53 tumor suppressor genes.

His work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and others.

Sir Peter John Ratcliffe FRS

Sir Peter John Ratcliffe FRS (born 14 May 1954) is a British doctor and cell and molecular biologist best known for his work on cellular reactions to hypoxia, for which he shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2019. He was a practicing clinician at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford and Nuffield Professor of Clinical Medicine and head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine at the University of Oxford from 2004 to 2016.

In 2016 he became Clinical Research Director at the Francis Crick Institute, retaining a position at Oxford as member of the Ludwig Institute of Cancer Research and Director of the Target Discovery Institute, University of Oxford.

Gregg Leonard Semenza

Gregg Leonard Semenza (born July 1, 1956) is the C. Michael Armstrong professor of pediatrics, radiation oncology, biological chemistry, medicine, and oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He serves as the director of the vascular program at the Institute for Cell Engineering.

He is a 2016 recipient of the Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research. He is known for his discovery of HIF-1, which allows cancer cells to adapt to oxygen-poor environments. He received the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for "discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability".

He studied beta thalassemia while doing his PhD at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Semenza completed his Pediatrics residency training at Duke University Medical Center


Follow Viral Mag on Twitter and Pinterest:

Follow us on Pinterest

0 Comments