Top 15 Unforgettable Movies Of The 1980s

Welcome to our list of the top 15 best and unforgettable movies of the 1980s. In the 1970s, Hollywood studios gave bold young directors free rein, resulting in a new golden age of movies (and a lot of ulcers for studio execs). In the 1980s, burned by the excesses and high-profile disasters of the '70s, the studios took charge again and started churning out safe, reliable, assembly-line product.
Top 15 Unforgettable Movies Of The 1980s

But you can't keep creative minds down. Despite the limitations and studio-mandated box office expectations, a number of excellent movies managed to get made, including some that achieved greatness by reinventing old genres and tropes.

1. Back to the Future (1985)

Marty travels back in time using an eccentric scientist's time machine. However, he must make his high-school-aged parents fall in love in order to return to the present.

Back to the Future is a 1985 American science fiction film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by Zemeckis and Bob Gale. It stars Michael J. Fox as teenager Marty McFly, who accidentally travels back in time from 1985 to 1955, where he meets his future parents and becomes his mother's romantic interest.

Christopher Lloyd portrays the eccentric scientist Dr. Emmett "Doc" Brown, inventor of the time-traveling DeLorean, who helps Marty repair history and return to 1985. The cast also includes Lea Thompson as Marty's mother Lorraine, Crispin Glover as his father George, and Thomas F. Wilson as Biff Tannen, Marty and George's arch-nemesis.

2. Platoon (1986)

A platoon of American soldiers patrols, fights and dies in the jungles of Vietnam, dealing with the horrors of bloodthirsty warfare and the immorality of their political masters.

Platoon is a 1986 American war film written and directed by Oliver Stone, starring Tom Berenger, Willem Dafoe, Charlie Sheen, Keith David, Kevin Dillon, John C. McGinley, Forest Whitaker, and Johnny Depp. It is the first film of a trilogy of Vietnam War films directed by Stone, followed by Born on the Fourth of July (1989) and Heaven & Earth (1993). The film, based on Stone's experience from the war, follows a U.S. Army volunteer (Sheen) fighting in the war while his two sergeants (Berenger and Dafoe) argue over the leadership of the platoon.

3. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)

Indiana Jones sets out in search of a biblical artefact called the Ark of the Covenant, which is coveted by many people. In his quest, he must face opposition from the Nazis.

Raiders of the Lost Ark (later marketed as Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark) is a 1981 American action-adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg, written by Lawrence Kasdan from a story by George Lucas and Philip Kaufman. It was produced by Frank Marshall for Lucasfilm Ltd., with Lucas and Howard Kazanjian as executive producers. The film originated from Lucas's desire to create a modern version of the serials of the 1930s and 1940s.

4. The Terminator (1984)

A cyborg assassin is sent back in time to kill Sarah, a waitress, in a bid to stop her son who will wage a long war against his enemy in the future unless the course of history is altered.

Terminator is an American media franchise created by James Cameron and Gale Anne Hurd. The franchise encompasses a series of science fiction action films, comics, novels, and additional media, concerning battles between Skynet's synthetic intelligent machine network and John Connor's Resistance forces with the rest of the human race. Skynet's most well-known products in its genocidal goals are the various terminator models, such as the T-800 (Model 101), who was portrayed by Arnold Schwarzenegger from the original Terminator film in 1984, and similar units he also portrayed in the later films. By 2010, the franchise had generated $3 billion in revenue.

5. Scarface (1983)

Tony Montana and his close friend Manny, build a strong drug empire in Miami. However as his power begins to grow, so does his ego and his enemies, and his own paranoia begins to plague his empire.

Scarface is a 1983 American crime drama film directed by Brian De Palma and written by Oliver Stone. It is a remake of the 1932 film and tells the story of Cuban refugee Tony Montana (Al Pacino) who arrives in 1980s Miami with nothing and rises to become a powerful drug lord. The cast also features Michelle Pfeiffer, Steven Bauer, Robert Loggia, F. Murray Abraham, and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio.

6. RoboCop (1987)

In a dystopic and crime-infested Detroit, a terminally injured policeman returns to the force as a potent cyborg haunted by submerged memories.

RoboCop is an American superhero cyberpunk media franchise featuring the futuristic adventures of Alex Murphy, a Detroit, Michigan police officer, who is mortally wounded in the line of duty and transformed into a powerful cyborg, brand-named Robocop, at the behest of a powerful mega-corporation, Omni Consumer Products. Thus equipped, Murphy battles both violent crime in a severely decayed city and the blatantly corrupt machinations within OCP.

7. Beverly Hills Cop (1984)

Police officer Axel Foley's close friend Mikey Tandino is murdered soon after he arrives in Detroit. Axel takes up the investigation of the case, which leads him to the crime world of Beverly Hills.

Beverly Hills Cop is a 1984 American action comedy film directed by Martin Brest, written by Daniel Petrie Jr. and starring Eddie Murphy as Axel Foley, a street-smart Detroit cop who visits Beverly Hills, California to solve the murder of his best friend. Judge Reinhold, John Ashton, Ronny Cox, Lisa Eilbacher, Steven Berkoff and Jonathan Banks appear in supporting roles.

8. An American Werewolf in London (1981)

When two tourists, David and Jack, visit a local pub in Britain, they are attacked by a werewolf. However, when David tries to explain the attack, the locals deny any knowledge of the wolf.

An American Werewolf in London is a 1981 British-American horror comedy film written and directed by John Landis and starring David Naughton, Jenny Agutter, and Griffin Dunne. The film tells the story of two American students who are attacked by a werewolf while on a backpacking holiday in England.

The film was released by Universal Pictures in the United States on August 21, 1981, the same year as werewolf movies The Howling and Wolfen. It was a critical and commercial success, winning the 1981 Saturn Award for Best Horror Film and the first ever Academy Award for Best Makeup. Since its release, it has become a cult classic. A sequel, An American Werewolf in Paris, was released by Hollywood Pictures in 1997.

9. First Blood (1982)

John Rambo, a former US soldier traumatised by memories of the Vietnam War, gets into trouble when an incident with a small-town sheriff triggers his violent side.

First Blood is a 1982 American action film directed by Ted Kotcheff, and co-written by Sylvester Stallone, who also stars as Vietnam War veteran John Rambo. It co-stars Richard Crenna and Brian Dennehy, and is the first installment in the Rambo franchise, followed by Rambo: First Blood Part II.

10. Amadeus (1984)

Antonio Salieri envies Mozart whom he believes to be a great musician. Having come to the conclusion that Mozart receives divine assistance in his compositions, Salieri turns against God.

Amadeus is a 1984 American epic period biographical drama film directed by Miloš Forman and adapted by Peter Shaffer from his stage play Amadeus. The story is set in Vienna, Austria during the latter half of the 18th century, and is a fictionalized biography of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart's music is heard extensively in the soundtrack of the film. The film follows a fictional rivalry between Mozart and Italian composer Antonio Salieri at the court of Emperor Joseph II.

11. Die Hard (1988)

Just as Detective McClane lands in LA to spend Christmas with his wife, he learns about a hostage situation in an office building. Hans Gruber is the culprit and McClane's wife is one of the hostages.

Die Hard is a 1988 American action thriller film directed by John McTiernan, written by Steven E. de Souza and Jeb Stuart. Based on Roderick Thorp's 1979 novel Nothing Lasts Forever, it was produced by the Gordon Company and Silver Pictures, and distributed by 20th Century Fox. The film follows off-duty New York City Police Department officer John McClane (Bruce Willis) who is caught in a Los Angeles skyscraper during a heist led by Hans Gruber (Alan Rickman).

12. Aliens (1986)

Ellen Ripley is sent back to the planet LV-426 to establish contact with a terraforming colony. Once there, she encounters the Alien Queen and her offspring and has to fight them to survive.

Aliens is a 1986 American science fiction action film written and directed by James Cameron, produced by Gale Anne Hurd and starring Sigourney Weaver. It is the second installment of the Alien franchise. The film follows Weaver's character Ellen Ripley as she returns to the moon where her crew encountered the hostile Alien creature, this time accompanied by a unit of space marines. Additional roles are played by Carrie Henn, Michael Biehn, Paul Reiser, Lance Henriksen, Jenette Goldstein, William Hope, Al Matthews, and Bill Paxton.

13. Return of the Jedi (1983)

Luke Skywalker attempts to bring his father back to the light side of the 'Force'. At the same time, the rebels hatch a plan to destroy the second Death Star.

Return of the Jedi (also known as Star Wars: Episode VI – Return of the Jedi) is a 1983 American epic space-opera film directed by Richard Marquand. The screenplay is by Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas from a story by Lucas, who was also the executive producer. It is the third installment in the original Star Wars trilogy, set one year after The Empire Strikes Back.

The film stars Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Billy Dee Williams, Anthony Daniels, David Prowse, Kenny Baker, Peter Mayhew and Frank Oz. It is the sixth film (though the third released) in the nine-part 'Skywalker saga'.

14. Full Metal Jacket (1987)

During the Vietnam War, under the ruthless command of Hartman, a few recruits face mental breakdowns. After a bizarre event, the soldiers are left to deal with the war's hellish mayhem.

Full Metal Jacket is a 1987 war film directed, co-written, and produced by Stanley Kubrick and starring Matthew Modine, R. Lee Ermey, Vincent D'Onofrio and Adam Baldwin. The screenplay by Kubrick, Michael Herr, and Gustav Hasford was based on Hasford's novel The Short-Timers (1979). The storyline follows a platoon of U.S. Marines through their boot camp training in Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, primarily focusing on two privates, Joker and Pyle, who struggle under their abusive drill instructor, Gunnery Sergeant Hartman, and the experiences of two of the platoon's Marines in Vietnamese cities of Da Nang and Huế during the Tet Offensive of the Vietnam War. The film's title refers to the full metal jacket bullet used by military servicemen. The film was released in the United States on June 26, 1987.

15. Escape from New York (1981)

Gruff Snake Plissken, an ex-soldier turned convict, is sent to Manhattan, now a maximum security prison, to rescue the stranded US President.

Escape from New York (also known as John Carpenter's Escape from New York) is a 1981 American science fiction action film co-written, co-scored and directed by John Carpenter. It stars Kurt Russell, Lee Van Cleef, Donald Pleasence, Ernest Borgnine, Isaac Hayes, Adrienne Barbeau, and Harry Dean Stanton.

Follow Viral Mag On Twitter



-

Post a Comment

0 Comments