Jeff Bezos' cell phone was hacked in 2018 after he received a malicious WhatsApp message from the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, months before the National Enquirer exposed his affair, it has been claimed. The Amazon billionaire received a video file containing malicious code from Mohammed Bin Salman's personal phone number, The Guardian reported on Tuesday.

HOW THE 'HACK' UNFOLDED

September 2017: David Pecker, the publisher of AMI, reportedly meets Mohammed bin Salman

How The Hacking of Jeff Bezos's phone unfolded

David Pecker, the publisher of AMI which owns the National Enquirer met the crown prince in September 2017. Both have strenuously denied working together in the past to attack Bezos.

April 2018: The crown prince attends a dinner in Hollywood hosted by producer Brian Grazer where he meets Jeff Bezos

The crown prince attends a dinner in Hollywood hosted by producer Brian Grazer where he meets Jeff Bezos

Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, who is set on reforming his nation, was fêted Wednesday, April 2018 at a Hollywood dinner hosted by power producer and director Brian Grazer and wife Veronica, plus Endeavor boss Ari Emanuel.

Guests at the feast at Grazer’s home included Jeff Bezos, Disney’s Bob Iger, Patriots owner Robert Kraft, Ron Howard, Snapchat’s Evan Spiegel, and Kobe Bryant, who we’re told the prince had specifically requested to meet.

Also there were ex-Trump adviser, former Goldman exec Dina Powell and Vice co-founder Shane Smith. Page6 reported.

May 1 2018: The video is sent from the prince's phone to Bezos' via WhatsApp

The video is sent from the prince's phone to Bezos' via WhatsApp

Citing unnamed sources with knowledge of an international investigation into the hacking, The Guardian report reveals that Bezos' phone was infiltrated after opening a malicious video file sent from the crown prince's number on WhatsApp.

The two men reportedly had a seemingly friendly texting exchange on WhatsApp on May 1, 2018, after which an unsolicited video file was sent from bin Salman's account. After Bezos opened the file, data was rapidly extracted from his personal phone, according to the report.

October 2018: Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi is murdered by Saudi regime

Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi is murdered by Saudi regime

The assassination of Jamal Khashoggi—a Saudi dissident, journalist for The Washington Post, and former general manager and editor-in-chief of the Al-Arab News Channel—occurred on 2 October 2018 at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, and was perpetrated by agents of the Saudi government. Lured to the consulate building on the pretext of providing him papers for his upcoming wedding, Khashoggi was ambushed, suffocated, and dismembered by a 15-member squad of Saudi assassins. Khashoggi's final moments are captured in audio recordings, transcripts of which were subsequently made public.

The Turkish investigation concluded that Khashoggi had been strangled as soon as he entered the consulate building, and that his body was dismembered and disposed of. Turkish investigators, as well as investigations by the New York Times, concluded that some of the 15 members of the Saudi hit team were closely connected to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, and that the team had traveled to Istanbul specifically to commit the murder according to Wikipedia.



January 2019: The National Enquirer publishes its expose on Bezos' affair with Lauren Sanchez

The National Enquirer publishes its expose on Bezos' affair with Lauren Sanchez

When the National Enquirer published explicit text messages between Amazon founder Jeffrey P. Bezos and the woman he was having an affair with, the world’s richest man made clear he wanted to find out how the tabloid got hold of his private communications.
Bezos commissioned an investigation into the Enquirer’s investigation of his love life, thereby leaping into a roiling mix of political attacks and conspiracy theories featuring the president of the United States, key figures in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election, minor Hollywood celebrities and the owner of The Washington Post, Bezos himself.

March 2019: Bezos' private investigator Gavin De Becker says he has proof Saudi Arabia hacked Bezos' phone - Saudi Arabia denies it

Gavin de Becker, a security consultant for Bezos, made his accusations in a 2000-plus-word post in the Daily Beast, which the news site labeled as “opinion.” The investigator gave no direct evidence to reinforce his allegations, which furthered a suggestion made by Bezos in February that the tabloid’s interest in his personal life could be linked to the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Enquirer parent American Media Inc. has offered an explanation with far less political intrigue: It learned of Bezos’ affair from his lover’s brother.

De Becker said Bezos is a target of the Saudi government because Bezos owns the Washington Post, which has written extensively about Khashoggi’s murder at a Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

January 2020: The Guardian reports that the prince's message was the source of the hack. A UN report comes to the same conclusion

The Guardian reports that the prince's message was the source of the hack. A UN report comes to the same conclusion

The Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos had his mobile phone “hacked” in 2018 after receiving a WhatsApp message that had apparently been sent from the personal account of the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, sources have told the Guardian.

The encrypted message from the number used by Mohammed bin Salman is believed to have included a malicious file that infiltrated the phone of the world’s richest man, according to the results of a digital forensic analysis.

This analysis found it “highly probable” that the intrusion into the phone was triggered by an infected video file sent from the account of the Saudi heir to Bezos, the owner of the Washington Post.

In a Medium Blog Post, Jeff Bezos wrote:

No thank you, Mr. Pecker
Something unusual happened to me yesterday. Actually, for me it wasn’t just unusual — it was a first. I was made an offer I couldn’t refuse. Or at least that’s what the top people at the National Enquirer thought. I’m glad they thought that, because it emboldened them to put it all in writing. Rather than capitulate to extortion and blackmail, I’ve decided to publish exactly what they sent me, despite the personal cost and embarrassment they threaten. READ MORE.


Follow Viral Mag on Twitter and Pinterest:

Follow us on Pinterest

0 Comments