Before reading about the Anti-Aging fruits, kindly note that there are two types of aging that we all experience: chronological aging, as in “we’re getting older every day.” The other type of aging is called “photo-aging,” which has nothing to do with how old we are, but it can make us look a lot older than our actual age.

Photo-aging comes mostly from exposing your skin to sunlight - the UV rays, both UV/A and UV/B, produce what are called free radicals. These are molecules with only one atom instead of two, so they’re quite volatile and they can damage the molecules around them.

10 Best Anti-Aging Fruits For Your Body

After all, the skin is often the first part of our body to show internal trouble, and there’s only so much that lotions, creams, masks, and serums can do before we need to take a closer look at what’s fueling us.

Researchers have even concluded that eating fruits and veggies is the safest and healthiest way to combat dull complexions and fine lines. Ready to glow?

The 10 Best Anti-Aging Fruits



  • Avocado
  • Banana
  • Pomegranate
  • Papaya
  • Apple
  • Kiwifruit
  • Watermelon
  • Grapes
  • Blueberry
  • Orange


1. Avocado


Avocado

Avocados are high in inflammation-fighting fatty acids that promote smooth, supple skin. They also contain a variety of essential nutrients that may prevent the negative effects of aging, a trusted source reported.

Nutrients and fat composition:

A typical serving of avocado (100 g) is moderate to rich in several B vitamins and vitamin K, with good content of vitamin C, vitamin E and potassium (right table, USDA nutrient data). Avocados also contain phytosterols and carotenoids, such as lutein and zeaxanthin.

Avocados have diverse fats. For a typical avocado:


  • About 75% of an avocado's energy comes from fat, most of which (67% of total fat) is monounsaturated fat as oleic acid.
  • Other predominant fats include palmitic acid and linoleic acid.
  • The saturated fat content amounts to 14% of the total fat.
  • Typical total fat composition is roughly: 1% ω-3, 14% ω-6, 71% ω-9 (65% oleic and 6% palmitoleic), and 14% saturated fat (palmitic acid).


Although costly to produce, nutrient-rich avocado oil has diverse uses for salads or cooking and in cosmetics and soap products. Avocados are also a good source of vitamins B, E, and C, copper and fiber; their potassium content is higher than bananas.


2. Banana


Banana

Youthful elasticity of the skin will be greatly helped by the high levels of Vitamin C and B-6, while its manganese and antioxidant contents prevent premature aging. It is also a wonderful natural moisturizer for the skin if applied topically.

Raw bananas (not including the peel) are 75% water, 23% carbohydrates, 1% protein, and contain negligible fat. A 100-gram reference serving supplies 89 Calories, 31% of the US recommended Daily Value (DV) of vitamin B6, and moderate amounts of vitamin C, manganese and dietary fiber, with no other micronutrients in significant content.

3. Pomegranate


Pomegranate

Scientists have discovered that a molecule in pomegranates, transformed by microbes in the gut, enables muscle cells to protect themselves against one of the major causes of aging.

A 100 g (3.5 oz) serving of pomegranate sarcotesta provides 12% of the Daily Value (DV) for vitamin C, 16% DV for vitamin K and 10% DV for folate (table).

Pomegranate seeds are a rich source of dietary fiber (20% DV) which is entirely contained in the edible seeds. People who choose to discard the seeds forfeit nutritional benefits conveyed by the seed fiber and micronutrients.

4. Papaya


Papaya

More than just a delicious fruit, papaya is a source of nutrients with a number of health benefits.

According to healthline, the many benefits of papaya can be attributed to the high content of vitamins A, B, and C. Its proteolytic enzymes, such as papain and chymopapain also have antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties.

Papayas have gained popularity as a natural home treatment, and for their use in skin and hair products. Their benefits vary and are summarized in the table below:

Skin benefits Hair benefits
wrinkle reduction conditioner
acne control hair growth
melasma treatment dandruff prevention

Raw papaya pulp contains 88% water, 11% carbohydrates, and negligible fat and protein (table). In a 100 gram amount, papaya fruit provides 43 kilocalories and is a significant source of vitamin C (75% of the Daily Value, DV) and a moderate source of folate (10% DV), but otherwise has low content of nutrients.

Papaya skin, pulp and seeds contain a variety of phytochemicals, including carotenoids and polyphenols, as well as benzyl isothiocyanates and benzyl glucosinates, with skin and pulp levels that increase during ripening. Papaya seeds also contain the cyanogenic substance prunasin. In traditional medicine, papaya leaves have been used as a treatment for malaria, an abortifacient, a purgative, or smoked to relieve asthma.

5. Apple


Apple

Whether you slice them in your salad or use their nutrients on your skin, apples can help you glow. They're full of vitamin C, a crucial ingredient for your complexion and hair.

"Vitamin C speeds up skin's cell production, which makes you look radiant, and strengthens hair and nails," says David Wolfe, nutrition expert and author. "Apples also contain B vitamins, like B5 and B9, proven to combat acne and irritation." Why not indulge in their beauty benefits?

A raw apple is 86% water and 14% carbohydrates, with negligible content of fat and protein (table). A reference serving of a raw apple with skin weighing 100 grams provides 52 calories and a moderate content of dietary fiber. Otherwise, there is low content of all micronutrients.

6. Kiwifruit


Kiwifruit

Kiwi fruit extract combines high essential fatty acids with impressive antioxidant properties, representing a perfect anti-aging ingredient both through topical application and oral use, according to a New Zealand company.

In a 100-gram amount, green kiwifruit provides 61 calories, is 83% water and 15% carbohydrates, with negligible protein and fat (table). It is particularly rich (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) in vitamin C (112% DV) and vitamin K (38% DV), has a moderate content of vitamin E (10% DV), with no other micronutrients in significant content. Gold kiwifruit has similar nutritional value, although only vitamin C has high content in a 100 gram amount.

Kiwifruit seed oil contains on average 62% alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid. Kiwifruit pulp contains carotenoids, such as provitamin A beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin.

7. Watermelon


Watermelon

Watermelon fruit extract and watermelon seed extract are excellent skin moisturizers, and they're found in a variety of skincare and cosmetic product formulations - for very good reasons.

Watermelon fruit is 91% water, contains 6% sugars, and is low in fat. In a 100 gram serving, watermelon fruit supplies 30 calories (125 kJ) and low amounts of essential nutrients. Only vitamin C is present in appreciable content at 10% of the Daily Value. Watermelon pulp contains carotenoids, including lycopene. The amino acid citrulline is produced in watermelon rind.

8. Grapes


Grapes

Grapes are round or oval berries that grow on woody vines in clusters ranging from about fifteen to nearly three hundred. Grapes feature semi-translucent juicy flesh encased in a smooth skin and may contain edible seeds.

Categorized as either “white” (green in color) or “black” (crimson, dark blue, deep purple, and reddish pink) grapes are more commonly referred to as green and red.  Mutations in the green grapes, has turned off the gene that accounts for the purple color found in red grapes.

Raw grapes are 81% water, 18% carbohydrates, 1% protein, and have negligible fat. A 100 gram reference amount of raw grapes supplies 69 calories and a moderate amount of vitamin K (14% of the Daily Value), with no other micronutrients in significant content.

9. Blueberry


Blueberry

Blueberries are sweet, nutritious and wildly popular. Often labeled a super-food, they are low in calories and incredibly good for you. They’re so tasty and convenient that many people consider them their favorite fruit.

Antioxidants protect your body from free radicals, which are unstable molecules that can damage your cells and contribute to aging and diseases, such as cancer.

Blueberries are believed to have one of the highest antioxidant levels of all common fruits and vegetables. The main antioxidant compounds in blueberries belong to a family of polyphenols antioxidants called flavonoids. One group of flavonoids in particular — anthocyanins — is thought to be responsible for much of these berries’ beneficial health effects.

Blueberries have been shown to directly increase antioxidant levels in your body.

Blueberries consist of 14% carbohydrates, 0.7% protein, 0.3% fat and 84% water. They contain only negligible amounts of micronutrients, with moderate levels (relative to respective Daily Values) (DV) of the essential dietary mineral manganese, vitamin C, vitamin K and dietary fiber. Generally, nutrient contents of blueberries are a low percentage of the DV. One serving provides a relatively low caloric value of 57 kcal per 100 g serving and glycemic load score of 6 out of 100 per day. Here are ten proven health benefits of blueberries.

10. Orange


Orange

Besides quenching your thirst, oranges help keep your body youthful. "This great source of vitamin C not only helps to boost immunity, keeping your body in better working order, but they also help build collagen," Lakatos and Lakatos Shames say. "Collagen makes the skin elastic, supple, and younger-looking."

As with other citrus fruits, orange pulp is an excellent source of vitamin C, providing 64% of the Daily Value in a 100 g serving. Numerous other essential nutrients are present in low amounts.

Oranges contain diverse phytochemicals, including carotenoids (beta-carotene, lutein and beta-cryptoxanthin), flavonoids (e.g. naringenin) and numerous volatile organic compounds producing orange aroma, including aldehydes, esters, terpenes, alcohols, and ketones. Orange juice contains only about one-fifth the citric acid of lime or lemon juice (which contain about 47 g/l).

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